08 November 2018

Who are they?




You are going to describe famous people and you classmates have to guess who they are. You only have to write a short paragraph about a celebrity and other people may send comments saying who they think each person is.

07 November 2018

Numbers




Click here to learn cardinal and ordinal numbers in English.

Now let's practise with numbers:
You can find more exercises with numbers in the section called Kids.

06 November 2018

Learn the Alphabet with Ray Charles

Shall we learn the Alpabet in English?
Some of you have just started leaning English, others may need to revise what you already know and for the rest of us, it will always be a pleasure to enjoy this cute song performed by the one and only Ray Charles.



A, B, C, D, E, F, G
H, I, J, K
L, M, N, O, P
Q, R, S,T, U, V
W, X, Y and Z
Now I've said my ABC's
Won't you sing along with me?
_____________
Now I know my ABC's
Next time won't you sing with me?

if you are ready for some spelling practice...


05 November 2018

Countries and Nationalities

Click here and do the exercises

04 November 2018

Phonetic Symbols.

If you have always thought that understanding phonetic symbols is just too difficult for you, don't despair. It just takes some practice to get used to them but they can be very useful to help you improve your pronunciation.

Vowels :








Study the chart of .

Move the mouse over the symbols and examples to hear them.



Consonants :











If you want to do some activities to practise phonetic symbols
and sounds in English



Videos from ESL Tower.com

Phonemic chart

Where are these people from?

Where are they from?







Countries and Nationalities

28 October 2018

Beginners ; Starting out.

Hi! How're you doing?
My name is Mª Jesús and I’m you new English teacher.

What's your name?
Here you are, ready to start learning a new language and here I am , ready to do my best to help you reach your goal.
I'm not going to tell you it'll be easy, it will require patience and effort but , step by step, your English will improve and you will find out that you can have fun as well as you learn.
Come on! Let's start from scratch.
We are going to practise how to greet people and introduce ourselves with the following activities:
Now let's practise with numbers:

Number Train




You can find more exercises with numbers in the section called Kids.

20 May 2018

Clauses of contrast, purpose and reason



Grammar points » B1 

Clauses of contrast


although, even though

We can use although/even though at the beginning or in the middle of a sentence followed by a clause (subject + verb). We NEVER use a comma after although or event though.
  • Although/Even though we had a bad game, we won. 
  • We won, although/even though we had a bad game.

however

We use however to connect two different sentences. We normally use however after a full stop (.) or a semi-colon (;). However should ALWAYS be followed by a comma.
  • We didn’t like the hotel. However, we had a fantastic time. 
  • We went to the beach; however, the weather wasn’t perfect. 

despite / in spite of

Despite and in spite of are normally followed by a noun or a –ing verb. They can go at the beginning or in the middle of the sentence.
  • Despite/In spite of the rain, we went to the concert.
  • They arrived despite/in spite of leaving very early. 
We can use a clause (subject + verb) after despite/in spite of the fact that.
  • We went out despite/In spite of the fact that it was raining. 

Clauses of purpose


to + infinitive

The most common way to express purpose in English is to + infinitive.
  • The student worked hard to pass the test. 

in order to/so as to + infinitive

In order to or so as to + infinitive are more common in formal English, mainly in writing. The negative forms are in order not to and so as not to + infinitive.
  • We were asked to stay in order to finish the project. 
  • He left home early in order not to be late.
  • Use a plastic hammer so as to avoid damage. 
  • They walked quietly so as not to wake up the children. 

so that + clause

We can also use so that + subject + verb to express purpose. We normally use a modal verb with this connector. (couldcanwould, etc.)
  • We left early so that we could park near the centre. 
  • He made some flashcards so that it would be easier for his mum to remember the instructions. 

for + noun

We can also use for + noun to express purpose.
  • We went to the bar for a drink.
  • Would you like to go the the park for a run?

Clauses of reason


When we want to explain the reason why something happened or why someone did something, we use a clause of reason introduced by a conjunction (assincebecause) or a noun phrase introduced by because ofdue toowing to, or on account of.

because

We use because before a clause (subject + verb). It can be used at the beginning or at the end of a sentence (at the end is more common). A comma is used when the clause of reason is at the beginning of the sentence.
  • We didn’t go because it was raining heavily. 
  • Because the event was cancelled, they lost their deposits. 

as/since

We use as and since in a very similar way to because. They are followed by subject + verb and can be used at the beginning or at the end of a sentence. However, as and since are more formal expressions, and more common in written than in spoken English.
  • The government urged people to stay indoors since/as more rain is forecast for the entire weekend.
  • As/Since the roads were blocked, the victims had to be rescued by helicopter. 

because of

We use because of before a noun.
  • The concert was postponed because of the heavy rain. 

due to

Due to means ‘because of’ although it is more formal. We also use due to before a noun.
  • The event was cancelled due to lack of interest. 
  • I couldn’t enjoy the meal due to their constant arguing. 

Click here to do some exercises and see the whole explanation with charts.


 
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